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internet:como_assistir_conteudo_drm_fash
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Como assistir conteúdo flash com DRM

Introduction

Many websites rely on Flash to play videos and use DRM to restrict the content to certain audiences. TV channels in particular are more and more numerous to offer REPLAY and VOD services for free but serve them with DRM.

The problem is that DRM support is not available in Linux versions of Flash (blame Adobe and Google all you want, it doesn't look like it's likely to change).

Overview of possible solutions

For a majority of websites, adding HAL support (required for DRM) won't help (and it's already done in LMDE 2 Betsy and in Linux Mint since version 17.2 Rafaela).

Along with Adobe, Google is part of the problem: They're the exclusive distributor of new versions of Flash on Linux, they only support their own browsers, the semi-open Chromium less so than the proprietary Chrome. In case you were ready to swallow your pride and to switch to Chrome for that particular reason, think again though… the only Linux platform they include DRM support for is Android, so that won't help either.

Pipelight is like a wrapper which makes your browser use Windows plugins. So with pipelight, you can run Firefox with the Windows Flash plugin… and IT WORKS! :) It's quite messy though… and I don't recommend you doing that. With pipelight you start including Windows layers beneath something you use every day.. not only that but it can mess up Webkit as well (that's used among other things by your login screen, your screensaver, other applications).

Rather than installing pipelight and having your OS use a Window version of Flash, we recommend installing a Windows version of Firefox. That way, your Linux system stays clean, it uses its own Linux version of Flash and Linux plugins, and in and only in that Windows version of Firefox is the Windows version of Flash used.

Installing WINE to run Windows programs

The first thing to do is to install WINE with the following command:

  apt install wine --install-recommends

With this done, you're now able to run Windows .exe files and programs.

Installing the Windows version of Firefox

Visit the following link:

https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/all/#pt-BR

Find your language and download the Windows version.

Once it's downloaded, go to your download directory and double-click on it (or right-click → Open With… and select “wine”) and install it like you would in Windows (i.e. keep clicking NEXT without reading anything).

Once installed, you now have two versions of Firefox:

  Your Linux version, in "Menu -> Internet -> Firefox"
  Your Windows version, in "Menu -> Wine -> Firefox"

Installing the Windows version of Flash

For some reason, installing Flash from within the Windows version of Firefox doesn't seem to work well. So instead, we install it directly just like we installed Firefox itself.

Visit the following link with your Linux version of Firefox:

https://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/otherversions/

Select “Windows 7” and the “Firefox” “NPAPI” version.

Once it's downloaded, go to your download directory and double-click on it (or right-click → Open With… and select “wine”) and install it like you would in Windows (i.e. keep clicking NEXT without reading anything).

Once installed, your Windows version of Firefox should now have Flash, and since it's the Windows version of Flash, you can use it to browse your favorite video websites (even though they're evil to use locked-in DRM content right?) :)

internet/como_assistir_conteudo_drm_fash.txt · Última modificação: 2020/05/11 03:54 (edição externa)